Opinion | Sustainable Population Australia

Opinion

Women population and why Camperon Diaz may make a good SPA spokesperson

Most of the comments posted after this online article, all assumably by women, were more concerned with women’s personal freedom to choose their fertility rates than the social or environmental consequences associated with reproduction. A number of readers suggested that the stigma associated with not having children is still inherent in Australian society. Some readers felt that society did not recognise them as ‘true’ women until they had bred, despite their personal preferences otherwise.

September 16 2011

Population and Sustainability: Can We Avoid Limiting the Number of People?

 In an era of changing climate and sinking economies, Malthusian limits to growth are back—and squeezing us painfully.
September 16 2011

THE WORLD IN 2050: A Scientific Investigation of the Impact of Global Population Growth on a Divided Planet

Rapid population growth in some regions, combined with increasing affluence and explosive growth in fossil fuel and natural resources consumption throughout the world, is seriously endangering a broad range of natural systems that support life. For the first time in history, much of the natural world is adversely affected by human activity.  Global warming is just one among many threats to sustaining human life, wildlife, and the natural environment.

September 16 2011

Save the planet by cutting down on meat? That's just a load of bull

Every weekend, rain or shine, I suggest that we flaunt our defiance of UN dietary recommendations with a series of vast Homeric barbecues.

We are going to have carnivorous festivals of chops and sausages and burgers and chitterlings and chine and offal, and the fat will run down our chins, and the dripping will blaze on the charcoal, and the smoky vapours will rise to the heavens.

September 16 2011

Ratio of males to females in China

Is still high, but only partly because of the one child policy
September 16 2011

Toward a new sustainable economy

The current financial meltdown is the result of under-regulated markets built on an ideology of free market capitalism and unlimited economic growth. The fundamental problem is that the underlying assumptions of this ideology are not consistent with what we now know about the real state of the world. The financial world is, in essence, a set of markers for goods, services, and risks in the real world and when those markers are allowed to deviate too far from reality, “adjustments” must ultimately follow and crisis and panic can ensue.
September 16 2011

The IVF revolution is money badly spent

Medicare rebates cover the bulk of scheduled fees and the Medicare safety net kicks in to cover 80 per cent of out-of-pocket costs once a patient has spent just $1111.60 in any year (a mere $550 if you're getting family tax benefits).
September 16 2011

Population ageing in Australia: Policy Implications

Recent projections published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics set out a range of possible demographic futures for Australia. This article examines 12 of these which all share the same life expectancy assumptions, but which differ in their assumptions for fertility and net overseas migration. It shows that all of the projection series that include net migration entail considerable population growth, but have a minimal effect on the age structure.

September 16 2011

A billion people less is a great place to start

Nadya Suleman had 14. And they should all be taken from her and raised by fit parents. Seriously, I could care less about the fact that she’s unmarried, unemployed, unable to convince herself that she’s not Angelina Jolie.

September 16 2011

"Overloading Australia" author gets opinion piece in The Advertiser

Mark O'Connor, co-author with Bill Lines of 'Overloading Australia,' was published in the Opinion section of South Australia's The Advertiser last week. Writing that "Australia's bizarrely high population growth lies behind many of our worst problems," Mark pointed out that many of the environmental problems we face in Australia today - including water shortages, unaffordable housing, excessive greenhouse gas emission - are all linked to excess population.
September 16 2011

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